Workshps and Demonstrations Autumn 2018

Saturday 20 October Fiona Staunton will show us how to make our own fermented foods, how good they are for us. This is a unique opportunity to learn an old method of food preservation.
10 am - 1 pm

A light lunch and refreshments are included with all day workshops.

Saturday, November 24 Elaine and Ronan Russel of www.newgrangewillow.com two amazing teachers who will be using willow for us to make fantastic baskets. Usually, a workshop like this is over 2 days but we will work hard, have some fun and create a beautiful basket.10 am - 4 pm

Saturday, December 1 Sally another brilliant teacher will be showing us how to make Christmas wreaths using willow from Mornington Garden, flowers from hedgerows and garden. We did this last year and I was blown away by the variety and creative wreaths that were made.10 am - 1 pm.

In the afternoon Sally will be helping us make table and house decorations using again nature as our theme. 2 pm - 4 pm.

If you book both Sally's workshops there will be a reduction - please contact me by email at dalkeygarden@gmail or 087 2256365

2019
First Workshop of the New Year
Saturday, January 26 Patricia Tyrrell a Masters Graduate of the School of Landscape Architecture at UCD will be here to help us design our gardens using the right plants for the right places. How to deal with tricky situations and allow us to benefit more from our outdoor spaces. 10 am - 4pm

Mornington Garden No dig

Botanical Mono Printing and Sketching in the Garden June 2108

Ants in the Garden

Are ants in the garden bad? The good and bad news about ants and plants. Just as a weed is a plant growing in the wrong place, insects in the wrong place are pests. Ants play a very important role in the ecology of your garden for good and for not so good. ... Ants are predator and prey since they eat the eggs of many insects and serve as food for birds, lizards, and other beneficials. Their tunnels aerate the soil and allow water and nutrients to flow directly to the plant roots. They also distribute seeds by storing them in their tunnels. The caterpillars of some butter­fly groups - read more on Blog page

Mornington May 17 2018

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Upcoming Events

Fungi aka Mushrooms

Fungi aka Mushrooms

Mushrooms are the flowering heads of Fungus
What do they do for our diets? What do they do in our garden?
In 1991 David Hawksworth, a mycologist at Kew estimated the world’s fungal diversity at 1.5 million species (equal to the estimated number of all known other living organisms). This was thought at the time to be a radical overestimate, but now other researchers have proposed figures in excess of 13 million. Guess what they are still discovering more
The majority of the world’s fungi are microscopic, tiny and they do not usually produce structures which are visible to the naked eye unless the *hyphae form a thick growth (Often referred to as ‘moulds’).
However, the most familiar species are those which produce spore-bearing fruit bodies, which are clearly visible to the naked eye. These include puffballs, coral fungi, earthstars, truffles and other forms of mushrooms and toadstools.
*The basic structures of most fungi are microscopic threads called hyphae

What do they do?
One particularly crucial role of fungi is in the transport, storage, release and recycling of nutrients.
The ability of fungi to decompose major plant components — particularly lignin and cellulose — is the basis of their organic recycling role. You can buy mycorrhizal fungi which speed up the root connection to the soil.
Without decomposer fungi, we would soon be buried in leaf litter and twig debris.
They are particularly important in litter (leaf) decomposition, nutrient cycling and energy flows in woody ecosystems, and are dominant carbon and organic nutrient recyclers of forest debris.
When you turn your leaf pile and see a white powdery covering that is decomposition in full swing the little thread-like hyphae.
Acid Soils =low ph. Eracious soil.
Fungi are particularly valuable in acid soils, where the low pH makes it difficult for the survival of other organic decomposers such as bacteria and worms.
Bacteria release nitrogen in the form of nitrate which is easily leached from the soil and therefore lost to surface roots.
However, the fungi that break down the organic surface litter release nitrogen into the soil in a form of ammonium nitrate which is less mobile. Less likely to be washed away into the nearby water systems. This could be very important to the successful establishment of young trees and to the sustainability of the ecosystem as a whole.
Fungi need a constant supply of organic matter to survive and thrive. Like us all, we need to be fed, as they do not have the ability to photosynthesise their own food, no green chlorophyll
The nutrient cycle relies on the reintroduction of dead material (compost) to provide a constant source for the fungi to decompose.
In an existing woodland the organic horizon — top layer, is topped up each year with falling leaves, but in our parks and gardens, or on new planting schemes, this source of nutrients is either non-existent or is removed as over-enthusiastic gardeners remove all the autumn leaves. In these situations, the application of an organic mulch becomes very important and will improve the quality and productivity of the soil.
Therefore save your leaves, compost them and add them back into your garden.

A well know Fungi on an ornamental, which we don’t like is
Black spot which is a fungi. It overwinters on fallen leaves, hence the reason to clean up diseased leaves, as spores will sit on the top of the soil and will through splash back up onto the plant.

Prevention is the best cure, spray with a fungicide, of your own makings such as MILK or Baking soda.
Mix equal parts milk and water, then apply this each week with a sprayer to the upper and lower section of the roses leaves. This milky solution causes an invisible and friendly fungus to form, which will help prevent the formation of the dreaded black spot.
Baking soda.
Mix one tablespoon of baking soda or baking powder into one litre of water and add a drop or two of washing up liquid for stickiness.
Again, apply this each week with a sprayer to the upper and lower sides of the roses leaves. The baking soda (Sodium bicarbonate) causes the rose leaf surface to become exceedingly alkaline which again prevents the blackspot from thriving. Remember fungi generally prefer a more acidic environment.
Both methods are effective only if used at the first sign of symptoms.

It is important to rake up the withered rose leaves and petals that litter your beds and borders, as these can act as a breeding ground for the blackspot fungus and to avoid splash back thus reinfecting the new leaves in spring. Pick or snip off any live leaves that exhibit black spots, as well as looking unsightly they aid the spread of the disease. All infected rose leaves and clippings should be placed into your brown bin not composted which could continue the cycle.
That is why never add to your compost diseased material.

In the good old days when we were allowed to have a bomb fire, diseased leaves and plants would be burnt ant the wood ash added to the compost, but now the priority is given to burning fossil fuels in our cars and an excess of methane from our beautiful cows.
Most importantly do not worry if you see Mushroom rings in your garden lawn, Fairy rings, your lawn may be a bit damaged but don’t worry as they will disappear. If you can remove them before they send off their spores as then, control is very difficult.
There is a very serious fungus which is called Honey Fungus and this can have serious consequences on the health of your trees.
If it is present you will see the tiny hyphae on the tree trunk.
Call a tree surgeon.

Fionnuala Fallons workshop

DESIGNING YOUR CUT FLOWER GARDEN WITH FIONNUALA FALLON

With delight, I look forward to welcoming Fionnuala Fallon of the Irish Flower Farmer and Irish Times on Saturday 13 as part of Dalkey Creates writing festival. We will be here in Mornington Garden the home of  Dalkey Garden School from 10 – 1 pm If you would like to come to call me now on 087 2256365. The cost for the morning is €45    SOLD OUT

Fionnuala Fallons workshop.

 

Upcoming Events

Fungi aka Mushrooms

Fungi aka Mushrooms

Mushrooms are the flowering heads of Fungus
What do they do for our diets? What do they do in our garden?
In 1991 David Hawksworth, a mycologist at Kew estimated the world’s fungal diversity at 1.5 million species (equal to the estimated number of all known other living organisms). This was thought at the time to be a radical overestimate, but now other researchers have proposed figures in excess of 13 million. Guess what they are still discovering more
The majority of the world’s fungi are microscopic, tiny and they do not usually produce structures which are visible to the naked eye unless the *hyphae form a thick growth (Often referred to as ‘moulds’).
However, the most familiar species are those which produce spore-bearing fruit bodies, which are clearly visible to the naked eye. These include puffballs, coral fungi, earthstars, truffles and other forms of mushrooms and toadstools.
*The basic structures of most fungi are microscopic threads called hyphae

What do they do?
One particularly crucial role of fungi is in the transport, storage, release and recycling of nutrients.
The ability of fungi to decompose major plant components — particularly lignin and cellulose — is the basis of their organic recycling role. You can buy mycorrhizal fungi which speed up the root connection to the soil.
Without decomposer fungi, we would soon be buried in leaf litter and twig debris.
They are particularly important in litter (leaf) decomposition, nutrient cycling and energy flows in woody ecosystems, and are dominant carbon and organic nutrient recyclers of forest debris.
When you turn your leaf pile and see a white powdery covering that is decomposition in full swing the little thread-like hyphae.
Acid Soils =low ph. Eracious soil.
Fungi are particularly valuable in acid soils, where the low pH makes it difficult for the survival of other organic decomposers such as bacteria and worms.
Bacteria release nitrogen in the form of nitrate which is easily leached from the soil and therefore lost to surface roots.
However, the fungi that break down the organic surface litter release nitrogen into the soil in a form of ammonium nitrate which is less mobile. Less likely to be washed away into the nearby water systems. This could be very important to the successful establishment of young trees and to the sustainability of the ecosystem as a whole.
Fungi need a constant supply of organic matter to survive and thrive. Like us all, we need to be fed, as they do not have the ability to photosynthesise their own food, no green chlorophyll
The nutrient cycle relies on the reintroduction of dead material (compost) to provide a constant source for the fungi to decompose.
In an existing woodland the organic horizon — top layer, is topped up each year with falling leaves, but in our parks and gardens, or on new planting schemes, this source of nutrients is either non-existent or is removed as over-enthusiastic gardeners remove all the autumn leaves. In these situations, the application of an organic mulch becomes very important and will improve the quality and productivity of the soil.
Therefore save your leaves, compost them and add them back into your garden.

A well know Fungi on an ornamental, which we don’t like is
Black spot which is a fungi. It overwinters on fallen leaves, hence the reason to clean up diseased leaves, as spores will sit on the top of the soil and will through splash back up onto the plant.

Prevention is the best cure, spray with a fungicide, of your own makings such as MILK or Baking soda.
Mix equal parts milk and water, then apply this each week with a sprayer to the upper and lower section of the roses leaves. This milky solution causes an invisible and friendly fungus to form, which will help prevent the formation of the dreaded black spot.
Baking soda.
Mix one tablespoon of baking soda or baking powder into one litre of water and add a drop or two of washing up liquid for stickiness.
Again, apply this each week with a sprayer to the upper and lower sides of the roses leaves. The baking soda (Sodium bicarbonate) causes the rose leaf surface to become exceedingly alkaline which again prevents the blackspot from thriving. Remember fungi generally prefer a more acidic environment.
Both methods are effective only if used at the first sign of symptoms.

It is important to rake up the withered rose leaves and petals that litter your beds and borders, as these can act as a breeding ground for the blackspot fungus and to avoid splash back thus reinfecting the new leaves in spring. Pick or snip off any live leaves that exhibit black spots, as well as looking unsightly they aid the spread of the disease. All infected rose leaves and clippings should be placed into your brown bin not composted which could continue the cycle.
That is why never add to your compost diseased material.

In the good old days when we were allowed to have a bomb fire, diseased leaves and plants would be burnt ant the wood ash added to the compost, but now the priority is given to burning fossil fuels in our cars and an excess of methane from our beautiful cows.
Most importantly do not worry if you see Mushroom rings in your garden lawn, Fairy rings, your lawn may be a bit damaged but don’t worry as they will disappear. If you can remove them before they send off their spores as then, control is very difficult.
There is a very serious fungus which is called Honey Fungus and this can have serious consequences on the health of your trees.
If it is present you will see the tiny hyphae on the tree trunk.
Call a tree surgeon.

Fionnuala Fallons workshop

DESIGNING YOUR CUT FLOWER GARDEN WITH FIONNUALA FALLON

With delight, I look forward to welcoming Fionnuala Fallon of the Irish Flower Farmer and Irish Times on Saturday 13 as part of Dalkey Creates writing festival. We will be here in Mornington Garden the home of  Dalkey Garden School from 10 – 1 pm If you would like to come to call me now on 087 2256365. The cost for the morning is €45    SOLD OUT

Fionnuala Fallons workshop.