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Spring/Summer 6 week course of Gardening Classes Commences Tuesday 26 / Thursday 28 March.

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HAPPY NEW YEAR 2019 Chinese year of the pig (猪—zhū).The original no dig machine.All those who received gifts of DGS vouchers I look forward to hearing from you.

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Mornington Garden No dig

Botanical Mono Printing and Sketching in the Garden June 2108

Ants in the Garden

Are ants in the garden bad? The good and bad news about ants and plants. Just as a weed is a plant growing in the wrong place, insects in the wrong place are pests. Ants play a very important role in the ecology of your garden for good and for not so good. ... Ants are predator and prey since they eat the eggs of many insects and serve as food for birds, lizards, and other beneficials. Their tunnels aerate the soil and allow water and nutrients to flow directly to the plant roots. They also distribute seeds by storing them in their tunnels. The caterpillars of some butter­fly groups - read more on Blog page

Mornington May 17 2018

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Upcoming Events

Willow Weaving Workshop Saturday 4 March 10 -1pm & Saturdat March 23 10 – 4pm Vegetable Gardening and Planning with Klaus Laitenberger

Willow one of our very native plants, supplying pollen for bees early in the season,playable for basketmaking,garden arches, support, tunnels sculptor.

This morning workshop will learn the basics of willow weaving.

All materials supplied, notes and  refreshments.

click here for more  information

Vegetable Gardening &  Planning

Very excited to welcome Klaus who is one of Ireland’s and Europe’s most respected vegetable growing horticulturists, where he is renowned for his expertise in soil management and organic gardening.  In fact, he is regarded as an organic vegetable gardening expert. He writes for various vegetable growing and gardening publications specialising in organics and soil sustainability.

 

5 Things to do in February

5 things to do in February

1. Cut back ornamental grasses  such as Stipa gigantia, Calamagrostis x acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’  Grasses such as Stipa tenuissima – Pony Tail grass, Stipa arundinacea better to pull your fingers through and remove spent fronds.Better to wait until the soil warms up before dividing clumps of grasses and there is better new growth.

2.Prune apple and pear trees whilst they’re still dormant. Leave plum , cherry  and apricot trees until the early summer as pruning these fruit trees now will make them susceptible to Silver Leaf disease.As soon as they start to open their leaves, good time to prune as their sap is now beginning to rise.

3  Plant bear rooted trees and roses .I prefer to plant my roses when in flower so that I am sure I have what I want – labels can get mixed up.Using a Mycorrhizal fungi can add dividends creating that bridge between root and soil.

4 Check out all the fabulous scented shrubs now such as Daphne, Viburnum x bodnantense, Witch Hazel – Hamamelis x intermedia and Wintersweet Chimonanthus praecox.

If you have these shrubs already once  they have finished flowering ,carry out a light pruning.

5 As the weather has been very mild,the soil is not too cold — well here in Dalkey. If you haven’t mulched do so immediately. You can use piles of leaves. shredded compost, manure, and compost such as Enrich.This acts like a blanket, surpasses weeds, protects the soil structure and also if we have a drought again next summer you will be glad you have done this, as it will act as a water retentive sponge in your soil.

Now the cold has arrived, how quickly we had forgotten how it can feel. Plants like tree ferns are not totally hardy so invest in some horticultural fleece and wrap them, making sure the wrappings are secure and will not blow off.

As the cold is necessary for lots of plants and seeds to develop  be glad it has arrived. Wrap up, and enjoy the light – welcome to Spring 2019 and  the the rebirth of the garden.

Upcoming Events

Willow Weaving Workshop Saturday 4 March 10 -1pm & Saturdat March 23 10 – 4pm Vegetable Gardening and Planning with Klaus Laitenberger

Willow one of our very native plants, supplying pollen for bees early in the season,playable for basketmaking,garden arches, support, tunnels sculptor.

This morning workshop will learn the basics of willow weaving.

All materials supplied, notes and  refreshments.

click here for more  information

Vegetable Gardening &  Planning

Very excited to welcome Klaus who is one of Ireland’s and Europe’s most respected vegetable growing horticulturists, where he is renowned for his expertise in soil management and organic gardening.  In fact, he is regarded as an organic vegetable gardening expert. He writes for various vegetable growing and gardening publications specialising in organics and soil sustainability.

 

5 Things to do in February

5 things to do in February

1. Cut back ornamental grasses  such as Stipa gigantia, Calamagrostis x acutiflora ‘Karl Foerster’  Grasses such as Stipa tenuissima – Pony Tail grass, Stipa arundinacea better to pull your fingers through and remove spent fronds.Better to wait until the soil warms up before dividing clumps of grasses and there is better new growth.

2.Prune apple and pear trees whilst they’re still dormant. Leave plum , cherry  and apricot trees until the early summer as pruning these fruit trees now will make them susceptible to Silver Leaf disease.As soon as they start to open their leaves, good time to prune as their sap is now beginning to rise.

3  Plant bear rooted trees and roses .I prefer to plant my roses when in flower so that I am sure I have what I want – labels can get mixed up.Using a Mycorrhizal fungi can add dividends creating that bridge between root and soil.

4 Check out all the fabulous scented shrubs now such as Daphne, Viburnum x bodnantense, Witch Hazel – Hamamelis x intermedia and Wintersweet Chimonanthus praecox.

If you have these shrubs already once  they have finished flowering ,carry out a light pruning.

5 As the weather has been very mild,the soil is not too cold — well here in Dalkey. If you haven’t mulched do so immediately. You can use piles of leaves. shredded compost, manure, and compost such as Enrich.This acts like a blanket, surpasses weeds, protects the soil structure and also if we have a drought again next summer you will be glad you have done this, as it will act as a water retentive sponge in your soil.

Now the cold has arrived, how quickly we had forgotten how it can feel. Plants like tree ferns are not totally hardy so invest in some horticultural fleece and wrap them, making sure the wrappings are secure and will not blow off.

As the cold is necessary for lots of plants and seeds to develop  be glad it has arrived. Wrap up, and enjoy the light – welcome to Spring 2019 and  the the rebirth of the garden.