Workshops List 2019

Saturday  Workshops  2019   details will follow.

GI Cooking and Growing a container garden                         10 – 4 pm             19 January

with Cathy Sorohan  and Annmarie Bowring

Plant-Driven Design                                                                           10 – 4 pm              9 February

with Patrica Tyrrell

Willow weaving                                                                                       10 – 1 pm                2 March

with Annmarie Bowring

 Vegetable gardening and planning.                                             10 – 4 pm                 23 March

with Klaus Laitenberger

Designing the Cut Flower Garden                                                   10 – 4 pm                6 April

with Fionnuala Fallon

Easter Break

Planting summer containers

with Annmarie Bowring                                                                            10 – 1 pm               27 April

Pests and Diseases                                                                                 10 – 4 pm                 4 May

with  Ingrid Foley

 Growing Herbs as medicine                                                            10 – 4 pm               18 May

with Joan Hanrahan   & Annmarie Bowring

Summer propagation                                                                        10 – 4 pm            25 May

with Annmarie Bowring

Botanical Plaster Casting                                                                     10 – 4 pm              9 June

with Dee Crofts

Art in the Garden Pen and Ink sketching                                       10 – 1 pm             16 June

with Mairead   Byrne

Art in the Garden  Plein Air  Oil Painting                                       10 – 4 pm             23 June

with Orlagh Murphy.

Food Fermentation                                                                        Autumn date to be confirmed.

with Gaby Weilland

Fungi/Mushrooms in Mornington Garden

Fungi aka Mushrooms

Mushrooms are the flowering heads of a Fungus – plural Fungi

In 1991 David Hawksworth, a mycologist at Kew estimated the world’s fungal diversity at 1.5 million species (equal to the estimated number of all known other living organisms). This was thought at the time to be a radical overestimate, but now other researchers have proposed figures in excess of 13 million. Guess what they are still discovering more
The majority of the world’s fungi are microscopic, tiny and they do not usually produce structures which are visible to the naked eye unless the *hyphae form a thick growth (Often referred to as ‘moulds’).
However, the most familiar species are those which produce spore-bearing fruit bodies, which are clearly visible to the naked eye. These include puffballs, coral fungi, earthstars, truffles and other forms of mushrooms and toadstools.
*The basic structures of most fungi are microscopic threads called hyphae

What do they do?
One particularly crucial role of fungi is in the transport, storage, release and recycling of nutrients.
The ability of fungi to decompose major plant components — particularly lignin and cellulose — is the basis of their organic recycling role. Another most important role is that of a bridge between the soil and roots of plants, where the transportation of nutrients trace elements and much more to the growing plant. You can buy mycorrhizal fungi which speed up the root connection to the soil.
Without decomposer fungi, we would soon be buried in leaf litter and twig debris.
They are particularly important in litter (leaf) decomposition, nutrient cycling and energy flows in woody ecosystems, and are dominant carbon and organic nutrient recyclers of forest debris.
When you turn your leaf pile and see a white powdery covering that is decomposition in full swing the little thread-like hyphae.
Acid Soils =low ph. Eracious soil.

Click here to Read More
Fionnuala Fallons workshop

DESIGNING YOUR CUT FLOWER GARDEN WITH FIONNUALA FALLON

With delight, I look forward to welcoming Fionnuala Fallon of the Irish Flower Farmer and Irish Times on Saturday 13 as part of Dalkey Creates writing festival. We will be here in Mornington Garden the home of  Dalkey Garden School from 10 – 1 pm If you would like to come to call me now on 087 2256365. The cost for the morning is €45    SOLD OUT

Fionnuala Fallons workshop.

 

What to Do Now in the Garden October

Top 10 things to do in
your garden now

1 Photograph your garden- it is amazing how we forget.

2 Visit garden centres to see what plants/shrubs  are flowering now to fill in gaps

3 Divide large clumps of perennials – we get more plants, free up space and allow for better growth next year.

4 Take hardwood cuttings – this is when this year’s growth has become harder – firmer in other words not soft.

Take care to choose a healthy parent plant free from pests or disease and use a sharp, sterilised secateurs or knife. Careful labelling is key and should include the date the cuttings were taken, along with the name of the parent plant, use a compost 50 / 50 sand in a pot. Plant around the edges of the pot. Also, there can be a low rate of success so take lots. Unlike soft and semi-ripe cuttings, hardwood cuttings do not require bottom heat or a moist atmosphere. If you have space you can also simply dig a slit trench half the height of the cuttings and fill the bottom with sharp sand or grit.

Insert the cuttings vertically, to a third to half of their length and back-fill the soil, firming them in. You can use a hormone rooting powder, but this is generally felt to be unnecessary. Water well and label the cuttings so you know what they are. A cold frame can be placed over the top to encourage faster rooting if required.

Hardwood cuttings are very slow to form roots, so don’t expect them to root fully until at least the next spring. If rooted well the cuttings will sprout strong shoots and grow away.

Ideal shrubs for hardwood cuttings are Buddleia, weigela, privet (Ligustrum), Philadelphus, forsythia and willow, but you can experiment with any woody shrub that takes your fancy. Taking cuttings is free, and if they don’t succeed, no harm will have been done. Others plants eminently suited to being propagated from semi-hardwood cuttings include many shrubby evergreens such as rosemary, sage, lavender, box, escallonia, holly, viburnum, hebe, camellia, ceanothus, cistus and choisya. Good luck.

5 Plant bulbs for spring – wait till November to plant tulips. Think also of indoor bulbs for Christmas such as Hyacinths, plant NOW for Christmas. Narcissi Paper White take 6 weeks from planting to flowering and have an amazing scent to fill your home at Christmas when they are finished flowering plant them out into your garden the same with your Hyacinths.

6 Plan your flower borders for next summer — look at midsummer magazines etc for ideas also include spring as it will help you choose bulbs. Come to Patricia’s Workshop on Saturday, November 3.

7 Get your leaf pile organised — you can’t buy leaf mould.

8 Trim lawn edges, scarify and repair lawn, use a low nitrogen law feed.

9 Cut your hedges before frosts – pruning at this time of year is for shape.

10 Veg garden plant garlic, onions, broad beans and green manures.

It is very nice to have a neat tidy garden with good structure but don’t forget to leave some areas for all the little creatures to hibernate in – so don’t be too tidy. Leaf and wood piles make great places for hibernation and shelter. I take down my hanging baskets and replace with bird feeders. Birds are essential for our gardens and they do need a helping hand. Containers with water can act as little ponds for frogs and of course sources of drinking water for our little visitors.

There are lots of other jobs to do as well, but try and get as much done now before it gets too cold to venture out.

5 Garden Herbs for Flu Season

5 Garden Herbs for Flu Season

A very good reason to have your own selection of homegrown herbs available, the very good reason for including them in your diet, a good reason to cook from scratch. Here in Dalkey Garden School feel that understanding how to get the most from your garden, terrace, patio and balcony is really worthwhile.

5 Garden Herbs for Flu Season

Sunday, September 30.Gardening Workshop covering the basics.

The garden is now going to sleep, and now is also the time to plan your beautiful garden for next year.
Seed sowing at this time of year can give you a head start on Spring, roots develop and are stronger. Division of plants- making more, moving plants to better positions, planting bulbs for spring and summer. Feeding your soil, protecting it for the weather ahead- drought, are a few of what we will be covering.

Arranging Garden Flowers for Winter Interest

Sunday, October 7 10- 1 pm

Sally Horn florist extraordinaire.

Sally will show us how to use Seed heads, fresh flowers, greenery to make pleasing Winter displays. How to condition your flowers and greenery to get the longest life from them.

If you have a container you would like to use bring it, and we will also have some for you to use also.

All materials will be provided.

 

Fermented Foods

Fermented Foods

on some of my fliers, the date is wrong Sorry !!!

Saturday 20 October 2018

10am – 1pm

Ever wanted to try making your own fermented food but don’t know where to start? Come along to this demo and learn all about fermenting food and drinks, nature’s probiotics! Learn how to make milk and water Kefir, fermented vegetables, sourdough bread, labneh cheesecake and more. It is a fantastic way to introduce natural probiotics into the body. Walk away with your very own sourdough starter, recipes and a confidence to make them all at home.

Fiona Staunton is a  Ballymaloe trained Chef and has a Degree in Education from Trinity.
Having worked as a chef at Ballymaloe House she started her own successful catering business in Dublin in the late 1990s, catering for Private and Corporate functions.